PAID SUMMER INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITY

The Door County Community Foundation is offering an opportunity for a motivated college student (or high school student that will be a senior this Fall) to learn more about the philanthropic world by working as our Summer Intern. It’s ideal for anyone interested in pursuing a career in non-profit organizations, human services, or government.

This internship opportunity is designed to provide the young person an invaluable educational experience while still performing real work tasks for the Community Foundation.

You’ll learn more about:

  • How foundations evaluate grant applications submitted by non-profit organizations
  • The mechanics of the granting process
  • Developing relationships with our friends and donors
  • How foundations bring people together to accomplish great things for the community

You’ll help us by:

  •  Contacting charities to update our grantee due diligence files
  • Updating and maintaining our donor files
  • Assisting with special events, mailings, and other donor activities
  • Performing a myriad of general administrative tasks as needed

We expect that you are:

  •  Conscientious and detail-oriented
  • Willing to maintain a high level of personal and professional integrity
  • Able to keep confidential all donor and grantee information
  • Capable of working with others to accomplish the Community Foundation’s mission
  • Interested in having fun and enjoying your colleagues and work

Working Relationships:

  •  The Summer Intern reports on a daily basis to the Donor Services Officer but also works collaboratively with the other professional staff of the Community Foundation

Schedule:

  • 20 hours per week, during the regular business day, through your summer break
  • Specific days and/or hours worked is negotiable
  • Flexible schedule makes it easy to hold a second summer job (if you so desire)

Compensation:

  • $10/hour
  • As this is a temporary summer position, no benefits are provided other than copious amounts of free caffeinated beverages

Classification:

  • Part-Time, temporary, non-exempt internship

To apply, send cover letter, resume with applicable work history, and at least two references to:

Bret Bicoy
Door County Community Foundation
222 N. 3rd Ave.
Sturgeon Bay, WI 54235
or email careers@givedoorcounty.org

• Emailed resumes are preferred
• Resumes will be accepted until the position is filled
• We will begin reviewing resumes on Monday, April 22
• Interviews can occur in person or by video conference if you are not in the County

Community Foundation Awards Sustainability Grant to the Door County Medical Center Foundation

The Door County Community Foundation recently awarded the Door County Medical Center Foundation a Sustainability Grant from the John and Nell Herlache Community Impact Fund and the Bernice and Gene Hawkins Charitable Fund for the Ministry Fund.

The Ministry Fund Program is an initiative to improve the health and well-being of the people in Door County, especially the poor and vulnerable. In 2016, the Ministry Fund helped nearly 1,000 individuals in our community and distributed over $54,000 worth of assistance.

“The Ministry Fund, also known as Katie’s Fund, is a safety net when there is no other help available,” said Patrick O’Hern, Board Member of the Door County Community Foundation. “The Community Foundation is proud to support the Ministry Fund which provides one-time assistance to help Door County residents overcome a crisis.”

DSCN0894.JPG
From left to right, Kate Graf, Social Worker and Founder of the Door County Medical Center Foundation’s Ministry Fund, and Patrick O’Hern, Board Member of the Door County Community Foundation.

Since its founding 16 years ago, Door County Medical Center’s (DCMC) Ministry Fund has given more than $500,000 to local individuals struggling to meet their basic needs. Funds are given to patients in need of everything from durable medical equipment to prescription medications. The fund also provides help in paying utility bills or getting transportation to receive medical care, or finding temporary shelter while receiving medical treatment.

 

For more information about the Door County Medical Center Foundation, please call (920) 746-1071 or visit www.ministryhealthy.org/DCMH/home/Foundation.org.

 

The Door County Community Foundation’s Sustainability Grants program distributes grant dollars from funds such as the Arts Fund, Children & Youth Fund, Green Fund, Health & Human Needs Fund, Education Fund, Historic Preservation Fund, Healthy Water Fund, and Women’s Fund.

 

For more information about the Community Foundation’s services and various grant programs, please visit www.GiveDoorCounty.org.

 

The Door County Community Foundation, Inc. is a collection of separate charitable funds set up by individuals, families, non-profit organizations, private foundations and businesses that are managed, invested and disbursed for the current and future good of Door County. The Community Foundation was launched in 1999, currently administers more than $22 million in assets, and distributes nearly $2 million to charities in Door County every year.

###

Community Foundation Awards Sustainability Grant to the Gibraltar, Sevastopol, Southern Door, and Sturgeon Bay School Districts

The Door County Community Foundation has awarded Gibraltar, Sevastopol, Southern Door, and Sturgeon Bay School Districts a sustainability grant from the Ruth and Hartley Barker Memorial Fund, the Children and Youth Fund, and Arts Endowment Fund. This grant supports a visit from children’s book author, Lisa Wheeler.

Michigan author Lisa Wheeler will spend one day at each of the four Door County mainland school districts to give presentations to students in grades K-8. Wheeler has written over 35 picture books including the popular Dino series about dinosaurs playing various sports.

g&g
“In her school talks, Lisa Wheeler will share her research process with students and talk about how even fiction stories need research,” said Marcia Smith, Chair of the Door County Community Foundation. “Getting these children excited about the writing process at a young age sets them up to enjoy reading and writing for a lifetime. We are pleased to contribute to that fundamental joy.”

The Door County Community Foundation’s Sustainability Grants program distributes grant dollars from funds such as the Arts Fund, Children & Youth Fund, Green Fund, Health & Human Needs Fund, Education Fund, Historic Preservation Fund, Healthy Water Fund, and Women’s Fund.
The Door County Community Foundation’s Sustainability Grants program distributes grant dollars from funds such as the Arts Fund, Children & Youth Fund, Green Fund, Health & Human Needs Fund, Education Fund, Historic Preservation Fund, Healthy Water Fund, and Women’s Fund.

For more information about the Community Foundation’s services and various grant programs, please visit http://www.GiveDoorCounty.org.

The Door County Community Foundation, Inc. is a collection of separate charitable funds set up by individuals, families, non-profit organizations, private foundations and businesses that are managed, invested and disbursed for the current and future good of Door County. The Community Foundation was launched in 1999, currently administers more than $22 million in assets, and distributes nearly $2 million to charities in Door County every year.

A Community Worth Fighting For

I remember June 13, 2015, very clearly. It was a typically beautiful Saturday in Door County. The sun was shining; people were smiling; and seemingly all was right with the world. I was standing in front of a party tent, looking out over the crowd, waiting to be invited to the microphone to speak. We had all gathered on Sturgeon Bay’s west side to cut a ribbon and celebrate the grand opening of our community’s new skatepark. The Door County Community Foundation had played a modest role in helping to bring this project into being, so I was asked to offer a few comments on this exciting day.

I had written out some notes of the things I wanted to say that are customary for such an occasion. The skatepark is a wonderful gift to our community. Private philanthropic dollars were used to construct this new facility, thereby allowing the county’s residents to enjoy this terrific new park at virtually no cost to the city’s taxpayers. There were people who needed to be thanked and congratulations that had to be offered to those who gave our community this amazing gift. That’s what I had intended to say.

As I stepped up to the microphone, I surveyed the crowd and was heartened to see those who were in attendance. Sturgeon Bay’s mayor and several (then) City Council members were standing off to my left, all chatting with broad smiles on their faces. To the right side of the crowd, I noticed a number of our most vocal citizens who – even their detractors would agree – are passionate and effective advocates for the causes about which they care most. They, too, were filled with glee and laughter. Everyone was in a wonderful mood.

It was at that very moment that I put my notes back in my pocket. There was something else I felt compelled to say.

I told the crowd how impressive it was that people who disagree on so many things had set aside their differences to work together to build this skatepark. From elected leaders to community activists to young people in our community, these good folks had realized that they actually do have something very important in common. Rather than let their differences on countless other issues prevent them from collaborating on any project, they chose to focus on the one project on which they could all agree.

Yet I noted that the important thing they have in common is not a desire to build a skatepark. What truly binds them together is a love for this place we call home. Each of them cares deeply about Door County and readily gives of themselves to make it better. I said that I’d seen their love and commitment to our community firsthand as I’d worked with each of them on this project. I know that they’d seen glimpses of it in each other as well.

Then I asked why so many of us seem to have overlooked the best in each other when it comes to another project just three blocks down the road.

For some context, in 2015, around the time of the grand opening of the skatepark, the city was in the midst of a fight over the use of the westside waterfront area some three blocks from the skatepark. The mayor, the former City Council and several other residents were in favor of building the proposed Sawyer Hotel on that waterfront property. In opposition were numerous vocal citizens who were arguing against what they called the “big, dumb hotel.”

As I stood at the microphone on that beautiful early summer day, I couldn’t help but point out the sad irony of it all. Several of those same people who were standing and smiling together in the crowd at the new skatepark were also demonizing each other over a hotel project just three blocks down the road.

I asked the crowd to take the lessons from this skatepark experience and apply it to their dispute over the westside waterfront. There’s nothing wrong about passionate people who care deeply for Door County talking through their differing ideas as to what’s best for our community’s future. In fact, we want a diversity of ideas because it is through a discussion of alternative futures that we will arrive at the most vibrant vision for all of Door County. However, if we choose to demonize those who disagree with our position on the current issue, we cannot have a productive conversation when confronted with the next issue.

Our most fundamental shared value is that we all love Door County, and each of us wants it to thrive. It’s that very value that inspires so many good people to get involved in public life as volunteers, activists or elected officials. Very often we find ourselves differing as to whether we should build this building, preserve this structure or enact this policy. If we begin these difficult conversations rooted in the recognition that we’re all trying to do what’s right for our community, then we can continue to be an actual community. But when we question the motives and impugn the integrity of those neighbors with whom we disagree, we rip the very fabric that binds us together.

Those comments I made four years ago seem even more poignant today. Our community is now engaged in a great debate over the future of the Teweles and Brandeis Grain Elevator. Although the Door County Community Foundation is facilitating a significant contribution from a few donor families that want to preserve the granary, the Community Foundation itself has taken no formal position on the matter except one: We ask that each of you begin the conversation by assuming that everyone involved loves this community as much as you do. We at the Community Foundation have worked on numerous projects with most of the key players in the middle of this dispute. We know from our own experience that virtually all of them are good people who are trying to do what they think is in the best interests of Door County.

At the Community Foundation, we recognize and honor the passion of those volunteers who have dedicated an enormous amount of time and money to save what they consider to be a historic treasure of Door County’s agrarian past. We also acknowledge and appreciate those who question whether it is prudent to spend a significant amount of money, private or otherwise, to save what they consider to be a dilapidated, old building. Reasonable people can disagree on what is the best vision for our shared future.

Where it becomes unreasonable is when people start posting on Facebook calling for a bonfire. It becomes unproductive when we use words like “buffoons” or “criminals” to describe honest people with whom we disagree. It becomes a tumor when we accuse others of violating their oath of office or acting unethically simply because they take a stand on an issue that is different from ours. It becomes a cancer when we assume those who oppose us must be doing so because they don’t love Door County as much as we do.

I don’t know how this dispute over the future of the granary is going to end, but I do know that eventually it will end. We’re going to have to continue to live together on this little peninsula when this fight is a distant memory. We had better take greater care in how we in this community talk with each other today, or we may find that our community of tomorrow may not be worth fighting for at all.

This article was written by Bret Bicoy, President and CEO of the Door County Community Foundation and originally appeared in the Peninsula Pulse.

Community Foundation Awards Sustainability Grant to the Door Community Auditorium

The Door County Community Foundation has awarded the Door Community Auditorium a sustainability grant from the Ruth and Hartley Barker Memorial Fund. This grant a ticketing and data management software upgrade.

“The Door Community Auditorium is the peninsula’s year-round’ venue for performing arts, entertainment, cultural and educational activities,” said Kacie Mueller, Community Relations Officer of the Door County Community Foundation. “From national touring acts, to community partnerships and school events, DCA serves as a center to enrich and entertain the community. We are pleased to provide this grant to support a software upgrade for a wonderful organization.

publication1
Pictured, from left to right are Alan Kopischke, Production Manager of DCA, Kacie Mueller, Community Relations Officer of the Door County Community Foundation, and Cari Lewis, Executive Director of DCA.

Home of unforgettable experiences, Door Community Auditorium (DCA) is Door County’s year-round venue for performing arts, entertainment, cultural and educational activities. DCA is recognized as a 501(c)3 organization and supported by Door County visitors and residents through ticket sales, sponsorship, membership and volunteer labor. For more information on the Door Community Auditorium, please visit http://www.dcauditorium.com

The Door County Community Foundation’s Sustainability Grants program distributes grant dollars from funds such as the Arts Fund, Children & Youth Fund, Green Fund, Health & Human Needs Fund, Education Fund, Historic Preservation Fund, Healthy Water Fund, and Women’s Fund.

For more information about the Community Foundation’s services and various grant programs, please visit www.GiveDoorCounty.org.

The Door County Community Foundation, Inc. is a collection of separate charitable funds set up by individuals, families, non-profit organizations, private foundations and businesses that are managed, invested and disbursed for the current and future good of Door County. The Community Foundation was launched in 1999, currently administers more than $22 million in assets, and distributes nearly $2 million to charities in Door County every year.

 

Community Foundation Awards Sustainability Grant to the Wisconsin Humane Society

The Door County Community Foundation has awarded the Wisconsin Humane Society- Door County Campus. a sustainability grant from the Bernice and Gene Hawkins Charitable Fund. This grant supports animal vaccines and veterinary medical expenses for homeless, abused, and unwanted companion animals in Door County.

“The Wisconsin Humane Society vaccinates all animals upon admittance to the shelter, which provides protection against potentially fatal illness to animals with unknown histories,” said Rob Davis, Board Members of the Door County Community Foundation. “We are pleased to support the Humane Society and the services they provide.”

dscn0889
Pictured, from left to right are Rob Davis, Board Member of the Door County Community Foundation, Puma, a cat currently available for adoption, Kellie Delveaux, Philanthropic Advisor, and Dan Miller, Shelter Operations Manager, both of the Door County Campus of the Wisconsin Humane Society.

Founded in 1879, the Wisconsin Humane Society has been saving the lives of animals in need for nearly 140 years. WHS is a 501(c)(3) organization and operates animal shelters in Milwaukee, Ozaukee, Racine, Door and Brown Counties, as well as a spay/neuter clinic in West Allis. WHS annually serves 40,000 animals.

For more information on the Wisconsin Humane Society, please visit www.wihumane.org.

The Door County Community Foundation’s Sustainability Grants program distributes grant dollars from funds such as the Arts Fund, Children & Youth Fund, Green Fund, Health & Human Needs Fund, Education Fund, Historic Preservation Fund, Healthy Water Fund, and Women’s Fund.

For more information about the Community Foundation’s services and various grant programs, please visit www.GiveDoorCounty.org.

The Door County Community Foundation, Inc. is a collection of separate charitable funds set up by individuals, families, non-profit organizations, private foundations and businesses that are managed, invested and disbursed for the current and future good of Door County. The Community Foundation was launched in 1999, currently administers more than $22 million in assets, and distributes nearly $2 million to charities in Door County every year.

###

A Wisconsin Dad

On the Wednesday before Thanksgiving I embarked upon a circle tour of much of the State of Wisconsin. My lovely wife Cari had to work that day thus she dispatched me to fetch our three children from college so they’d all be home for Thanksgiving. The day began early in the morning as I set out from Door County and drove south to UW-Milwaukee to pick up our sophomore there. Next I headed west for our freshman at UW-Madison. Then I ventured northwest to grab our senior at UW-La Crosse before finally turning east and traveling across the entire state to return home to Door County. My little tour took about 11 hours.

Of course, I had to repeat the entire trip just four days later as I returned our three children to their respective colleges. I didn’t mind it in the least.

My wife likes to refer to me as a walking enigma because I often do things that are difficult to understand. For instance, I love collecting hats, yet, I rarely wear them for very long. I love the way hats look but I don’t particularly like the feeling of them on my head. Hey, I’m a conundrum.

During those two recent circle tours of the State of Wisconsin I brought along my newest favorite hat, a baseball cap that I recently purchased at the UW-Madison bookstore. Purple is my preferred color, but I enthusiastically bought this bright badger red hat because it reads “Wisconsin Dad.” As I said before, I can’t tolerate the feel of a hat on my head for very long so the cap spent most of the drive sitting on the dashboard, staring me in the face.

Those two long days in the car gave me sore shoulders and an aching neck, but it also gave me the gift of time with my children. Whenever my kids return home, they have places to go and people to see. There are younger siblings, old high school friends, grandparents and countless others all competing for their attention. But for two days isolated in my car, I had my children – these delightful young adults – all to myself. I am so grateful for that time.

Of course, the kids probably didn’t see it quite that way. They know how long the drive will be and are always in a hurry to arrive at their destination. My children, like most people their age, are focused on themselves. That is only natural. College is the time in your life that you imagine your professional future and embark on the path to realizing the vision you have for yourself. At that age you’re supposed to be thinking about yourself because you’re working hard to build the self that you want to be.

I know our children are grateful, at least intellectually, for what my wife and I do for them. They are thankful that I drive them to and from college, that their mother and I write checks for their tuition, and we deposit money into their bank accounts so they can pay their rent. But when you’re young and focused on yourself, it’s hard to viscerally appreciate a sacrifice someone else makes for you. When you’ve experienced so little, and are still so concerned with starting your life, it’s difficult to truly understand gratitude.

Even early into adulthood, I don’t think that we humans understand gratitude very well. Getting that first real job, buying a house, paying your own bills – these things are about independence. Distilled down to its essence, the quest for independence is a desire to avoid being dependent on anyone other than yourself. Inherent in gratitude is the recognition that as much as you might try to avoid it, you’ll always need to depend on other people one way or another. That’s a hard to concept to grasp when you’re young.

Gratitude is a puzzling thing. It’s not an automated response to people who’ve done something kind for you. Instead, the seeds of deep and authentic gratitude are planted in your soul when you make a sacrifice for another. It’s when you experience the burden that comes from willingly accepting the mantle of responsibility for another that you can truly appreciate when someone does the same for you.

Goodness knows you don’t need to have children to understand gratitude, but for me it was only when I became a father – when I made the explicit promise to carry my children’s burdens along with my own – that I truly felt gratitude for those who’ve helped me. It was then that I finally understood what it meant to be responsible for another and it made me deeply grateful for those in my life who accepted some responsibility for me.

That’s why I love my “Wisconsin Dad” hat. I love being a Dad. I love living on Wisconsin’s thumb. But it’s more than that. It’s a reminder that like a father, I’ve accepted the mantle of responsibility for the things I love – for my children, for my little corner of Wisconsin that is Door County. Thankfully, I’m neither unique nor alone. For my children, I joyfully share that responsibility with my wife, our family, and many friends. For Door County, there are countless other people and organizations that work even harder than I do to care for this community we love.

I’m very pleased to display my Wisconsin Dad hat.

Of course, if I could find a “Door County Dad” cap, I might actually wear that one. Especially if it’s purple.

This column, written by Door County Community Foundation President and CEO  Bret Bicot, originally appeared in the Peninsula Pulse