Healthy Water Announces 2016 Well Testing Program Results

The results of the 2016 Healthy Water Well Testing Program will be announced at a public forum on Thursday, September 15th at 7 p.m. at Crossroads at Big Creek.

Healthy WaterThe program is supported by a grant from Healthy Water Door County, a fund of the Door County Community Foundation, Inc. Experts from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Environmental Research and Innovation Center will be on hand to share the results of this year’s testing and answer questions. Attendance is free. Questions can be directed to the Center at bussek@uwosh.edu or call (920) 434-3148.

Community Invited to Opening Reception fot Artist Marjorie Mau

The community is invited to attend a reception on Saturday, September 17th from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., at the Door County Community Foundation. The reception celebrates the Lobby Gallery Fall Exhibition featuring works by Marjorie Mau. The Community Foundation is located at 342 Louisiana Street in Sturgeon Bay, across the street from the Post Office.

Edges & Alvars 16 - Shale.Marjorie Mau graduated with honors from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay in 1979 and holds a Bachelor of Arts degree. She has received multiple awards for her work from both the Neville Public Museum and UW-GB. “I believe in a work that has to find its own way,” says Marjorie. “It has to breathe with open space and possibility.

The Community Foundation’s reception is being coordinated with the Wisconsin Watercolor Society Fall exhibition at the Miller Art Museum that same evening. The exhibition will bring together the work of artists from throughout the state working in watercolor. Guests are encouraged to visit Sturgeon Bay and drop by both the Miller Art Museum and the Community Foundation Lobby Gallery opening receptions.

Refreshments will be served at the Door County Community Foundation by Morag Hornsby and her team at Serves You Right Catering.

Each quarter, different Door County artists will be invited to exhibit their work. The Gallery is normally open to the public during the Community Foundation’s regular hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

For more information about the Community Foundation, visit www.GiveDoorCounty.org.

The Door County Community Foundation, Inc. is a collection of separate charitable funds set up by individuals, families, non-profit organizations, private foundations and businesses that are managed, invested and disbursed for the current and future good of Door County. The Foundation was launched in 1999 and currently administers more than $17 million in charitable assets.

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Community Foundation Awards Sustainability Grant to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeastern Wisconsin

The Door County Community Foundation has awarded Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeastern Wisconsin a Sustainability Grant from the John and Nell Herlache Community Impact Fund.  This grant provides financial assistance to support the enhancement of Door County programming.

Big Brothers Big Sisters programs match volunteer mentors with Door County youth.  The program is designed to support healthy behaviors and decision-making which leads to positive academic, socio-emotional and behavioral outcomes.  These positive outcomes lead to improved high school graduation rates, the avoidance of juvenile delinquency, readiness for post- secondary educational opportunities, and improved employment opportunities.

“The youth mentoring program prepares these young community members to be more productive citizens by helping improve their confidence, relationship skill and attitudes,” said Grace Rossman board member of the Door County Community Foundation.

Publication1Pictured from left to right are Grace Rossman board member of the Door County Community Foundation, and Kristen Mihaljevic, Community Relations Director of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeastern Wisconsin.  

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeastern Wisconsin is a donor and volunteer supported nonprofit organization that professionally matches youth with mentors.  Since 1972, communities in Northeastern Wisconsin have been enriched by Big Brothers Big Sisters’ mission to make a positive difference in the lives of youth through professionally supported, one-to-one mentoring relationships.  The program is based on the documented premise that youth need the influence of mature, responsible and supportive mentors during their formative years in order to reach their full potential as adults.

For more information regarding the programs and services provided by Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeastern Wisconsin, please call 920-498-2227 or visit www.bbbsnew.org.

The Door County Community Foundation’s Sustainability Grants program distributes grant dollars from funds such as the Arts Fund, Children & Youth Fund, Green Fund, Health & Human Needs Fund, Education Fund, Historic Preservation Fund, Healthy Water Fund, and the Women’s Fund.

For more information about the Community Foundation’s services and various grant programs, please visit www.GiveDoorCounty.org.

The Door County Community Foundation, Inc. is a collection of separate charitable funds set up by individuals, families, non-profit organizations, private foundations and businesses that are managed, invested and disbursed for the current and future good of Door County.  The Foundation was launched in 1999 and currently administers more than $17 million in charitable assets.

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Community Foundation Awards Sustainability Grant to the Frances Hardy Center for the Arts

The Door County Community Foundation has awarded the Frances Hardy Center for the Arts a Sustainability Grant from the Ruth & Hartley Barker Memorial Fund and the William C. & Marjorie W. Glenn Endowment Fund. This grant will cover the expenses of upgrading the Hardy Gallery’s technology, specifically a retail point of sale kit. The retail cash register will optimize the time it takes for docents to perform transactions for gallery visitors and will provide confidence for both that the transaction was done correctly and securely.

“The Hardy Gallery’s purpose is to enrich the vibrancy of the Door County community through promoting and fostering local visual arts,” said Kacie Mueller, Community Relations Officer of the Door County Community Foundation. “Helping to fulfill that purpose are the gallery docents, volunteers from all over the peninsula. The Community Foundation is happy to be able to provide the funds to support a technology upgrade which will advance the quality service these volunteers are able to provide.”

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Pictured from left to right are Sarah Zamecnik, Executive Director of the Francis Hardy Center for the Arts & Kacie Mueller, Community Relations Officer of the Door County Community Foundation.

The Hardy Gallery is a place for new and established artists to premiere their work and gain visibility through a heavily visited establishment; the gallery logged over 12,000 visitors during their 6-month 2015 season.  Patrons can enjoy exhibits of local and regional artists, see the nationally recognized Community Mosaic Project, take in spectacular sunset views or enjoy meeting local plein air painters in and around the gallery during the Door County Plein Air Festival.

For more information regarding the Frances Hardy Center for the Arts, please call 920-854-2210 or visit www.thehardy.org.

The Door County Community Foundation’s Sustainability Grants program distributes grant dollars from funds such as the Arts Fund, Children & Youth Fund, Green Fund, Health & Human Needs Fund, Education Fund, Historic Preservation Fund, Healthy Water Fund, and the Women’s Fund.

For more information about the Community Foundation’s services and various grant programs, please visit www.GiveDoorCounty.org.

The Door County Community Foundation, Inc. is a collection of separate charitable funds set up by individuals, families, non-profit organizations, private foundations and businesses that are managed, invested and disbursed for the current and future good of Door County.  The Foundation was launched in 1999 and currently administers more than $17 million in charitable assets.

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The Certainty of Hope

At our community’s recent Celebration of Giving, the Door County Community Foundation recognized Annie and Dick Egan as the 2016 Philanthropists of the Year. Each year, I am humbled to have the opportunity to share a few thoughts about the remarkable people who are given this honor.

As I often do when preparing a few comments, I start by re-reading the words of people who are much more thoughtful and insightful than me. I was recently revisiting David Brooks’ book, The Road to Character when I was struck by a particular passage that I had highlighted some time ago.

Brooks was writing about those rare people you come across who seem to possess what he calls an “inner cohesion.” Brooks writes, “After you’ve known them for a while it occurs to you that you’ve never heard them boast, you’ve never seen them self-righteous or doggedly certain. They aren’t dropping little hints of their own distinctiveness and accomplishments.” I didn’t realize it when I originally highlighted this paragraph, but Brooks is writing about people like Annie and Dick.

dick & annie

I have played a tiny and tangential role helping facilitate the Egan’s generosity going back to my time working in Green Bay nearly 20 years ago. I’ve been to numerous meetings, dinners and receptions they’ve hosted for charities in our community. I’ve stayed with them in their home in Florida on several occasions. I’ve even helped Annie hang artwork and gone to baseball games with Dick.

Yet in all the time I’ve known them, never once have I heard them boast, nor seen them self-righteous or doggedly certain. Nor have they ever dropped the tiniest hint of their own distinctiveness or accomplishments.

As Brooks says, couples like Annie and Dick, “radiate a sort of moral joy. They perform acts of sacrificial service with the same modest everyday spirit they would display if they were just getting the groceries. They are not thinking about what impressive work they are doing. They are not thinking about themselves at all. They just seem delighted by the flawed people around them. They just recognize what needs doing and they do it.”

This is not to say the Egans are perfect or have never faced struggles or difficulties of their own. I have been honored to hear of some of those trials and been given the opportunity to learn from their experiences. Yet, it is precisely those internal struggles that has made Annie and Dick into the generous souls we celebrate today.

In his book Falling Upward, the Franciscan Friar Richard Rohr writes that, “One of the great surprises is that humans come to full consciousness precisely by shadowboxing, facing their own contradictions, and making friends with their own mistakes and failings.”

We’ve all heard the famous Serenity Prayer that was popularized as the mantra of Alcoholic’s Anonymous. The saying goes, “God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.” This is actually paraphrased from the original Serenity Prayer written by theologian Reinhold Niebuhr.

Since I was little boy, I’ve always had great difficulty accepting the idea behind the Serenity Prayer. I do hear wisdom in the words. Some kinds of sorrow we have no choice but to accept, as when a loved one suddenly dies or a cherished relationship ends. Even in the public sphere in which I work, there are times when our most admirable efforts fail to bear fruit. In some circumstances, continued resistance can do more harm than good.

Yet I deeply value wisdom. And I have great respect for those with courage. To simply give in, to acquiesce, to settle for being passive spectators is to accept things as they are as if that is the way they are destined to be. I have always believed that acting on our convictions, even in the face of seemingly insurmountable obstacles, helps broaden the horizon that defines the limits of what is possible.

Yet when I read Paul Loeb’s book, The Impossible Will Take a Little While, I finally recognized that my discomfort was born out of my own misunderstanding. He writes, “The Serenity Prayer is too easily misread as a gospel of resignation. That’s because it’s impossible to predict precisely what people can and cannot change. Wisdom comes not from anticipation but from action. The only way to find out what’s possible is through our deeds. And that’s true whether we’re tackling issues that affect the whole world or just our neighborhood.”

To read the future as already determined, be it implacable darkness or rosy dawn, is to give up on precisely that which can make the greatest difference – giving our all to the present. As Loeb notes, since we never know when one of our seemingly modest acts might help change history, or inspire someone else who will play a key role, we’d do well to savor both the journey of engagement itself and the everyday grace that we can draw on along the way.

Hope is not the conviction that something will turn out well. Rather, hope is the certainty that some things makes sense regardless of how it turns out.

Thus let me finish by going beyond the Serenity Prayer and quote instead from another of Reinhold Neibuhr’s prayers. “Nothing that is worth doing can be achieved in our lifetime; therefore we must be saved by hope. Nothing which is true or beautiful or good makes complete sense in any immediate context of history; therefore we must be saved by faith. Nothing we do, however virtuous, can be accomplished alone; therefore we are saved by love.”

My friends, Door County is the community we love. We have been blessed with the abundance provided by those who came before us. We are now entrusted with the stewardship of the community we have among us. And we are being given the opportunity to nurture a better future for those who will follow us.

In all sincerity, I have never met a couple that better exemplifies this idea than Annie and Dick Egan. They are my inspiration.

This article, by Bret Bicoy, originally appeared in the Peninsula Pulse.

Community Foundation Awards Sustainability Grant to Unity Hospice

The Door County Community Foundation recently awarded Unity Hospice a Sustainability Grant from the Health and Human Needs Fund.  This grant will assist with providing end of life care for critically ill patients who have limited to no financial resources.

Unity is the only provider of home-based palliative care for residents of Door County. To help meet the needs of patients and their families, Unity provides routine skilled nursing visits, 24-hour skilled nursing phone support, social work visits to assist with personal cares, chaplain visits to offer spiritual support and trained volunteers to provide companionship, caregiver respite and transportation assistance.

“The services provided by Unity are invaluable for community members who are coping with the effects of life-limiting and terminal illness,” said Polly Alberts, Chair of the Door County Community Foundation. “Unity delivers compassionate programming that supports patients, families and friends as we move through these major life transitions.”

DSCN0781-use 2.jpg

Pictured from left to right is Polly Alberts, Chair of the Door County Community Foundation & Diana Butz, Director of Development at Unity Hospice .

Unity is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit community provider of hospice care, palliative care and grief support in 12 counties throughout Northeast Wisconsin.  A true leader in its field, Unity has the distinction of having opened the state’s first hospice in 1977, the state’s first non-hospital based palliative care program in 2002 and the area’s first hospice residence in 2007. Unity provides a full spectrum of end-of-life care and education benefiting all members of the community.

Unity’s mission is “To bring the best end-of-life experience to our communities by delivering unwavering strength, compassion and support.”  Every day, nearly 550 patients throughout the region are served by Unity’s programming with the help of a committed group of 300 volunteers.

For more information regarding Unity Hospice, please call (800) 990-9249 or visit www.UnityHospice.org.

The Door County Community Foundation’s Sustainability Grants program distributes grant dollars from funds such as the Arts Fund, Children & Youth Fund, Green Fund, Health & Human Needs Fund, Education Fund, Historic Preservation Fund, Healthy Water Fund, and the Women’s Fund.

For more information about the Community Foundation’s services and various grant programs, please visit www.GiveDoorCounty.org.

The Door County Community Foundation, Inc. is a collection of separate charitable funds set up by individuals, families, non-profit organizations, private foundations and businesses that are managed, invested and disbursed for the current and future good of Door County.  The Foundation was launched in 1999 and currently administers more than $16 million in charitable assets.

 

Community Foundation Awards Sustainability Grant to the Peninsula Players Theatre Foundation, Inc.

The Door County Community Foundation recently awarded Peninsula Players a Sustainability Grant from the Arts Fund to support the program, The Play’s the Thing.  Components of the program involve offering free, off-season play readings to the public and also provides opportunities for students to receive play writing instruction that culminates in a play writing contest.

The free public play readings, held at various sites throughout Door County, provide the community with an enriching opportunity to hear plays read aloud that would not normally be produced at Peninsula Players.  In addition, students have the unique experience to learn about different ways of writing and then practice applying that learning with the help of professional guidance.

“These readings provided the community with the enriching opportunity to hear plays read aloud that would not normally be produced at the Players due to their size, nature and/or complexity,” said David Eliot, Past Chair of the Door County Community Foundation.

DSCN0650-use.jpgPictured from left to right is Davis Eliot of the Door County Community Foundation and Danielle Szmanda, Development & Events Manager. 

Peninsula Players Theatre is America’s oldest professional resident summer theatre and Wisconsin’s oldest professional theater company.  The Players have produced more than 500 plays at the “Theatre in a Garden” and is one of only two remaining resident stock theaters producing beyond the east coast.

For more information regarding Peninsula Players, please call (920) 868-3287 or visit www.PeninsulaPlayers.com

The Door County Community Foundation’s Sustainability Grants program distributes grant dollars from funds such as the Arts Fund, Children & Youth Fund, Green Fund, Health & Human Needs Fund, Education Fund, Historic Preservation Fund, Healthy Water Fund, and the Women’s Fund.

For more information about the Community Foundation’s services and various grant programs, please visit www.GiveDoorCounty.org.

The Door County Community Foundation, Inc. is a collection of separate charitable funds set up by individuals, families, non-profit organizations, private foundations and businesses that are managed, invested and disbursed for the current and future good of Door County.  The Foundation was launched in 1999 and currently administers more than $16 million in charitable assets.