Community Foundation Awards Sustainability Grant to Leadership Door County

The Door County Community Foundation has awarded Leadership Door County a Sustainability Grant from the Clifford and Clara Herlache Heritage Foundation. This grant will support activities for Leadership Door County’s session devoted to the History of Door County.

History Day acquaints class members with an overview of Door County history and some of the organizations and community leaders who convey historical knowledge. The day’s activities are chosen to help class members more fully understand immigration patterns and economic activity.

“During History Day, Leadership Door County class members are exposed to a variety of resources and speakers that help them understand the vast history of our county,” said Marcia Smith, Vice Chair of the Door County Community Foundation. “This is a critical session for the beginning of the class year as it provides a foundation of the other sessions and topics that will be covered throughout the year.”

2016-01-25-leadership-dcFrom left to right: Marcia Smith, Board Member of the Door County Community Foundation and Dawn Vandevoort, Leadership Door County Board president Leadership Door County brings together community members who have diverse viewpoints to become stronger leaders and to understand community issues through experiential education.

For more information about Leadership Door County, please visit www.leadershipdoorcounty.com or call 920.255.7233.

The Door County Community Foundation’s Sustainability Grants program distributes grant dollars from funds such as the Arts Fund, Children & Youth Fund, Education Fund, Green Fund, Health & Human Needs Fund, Healthy Water Fund, Historic Preservation Fund, and the Women’s Fund.

For more information about the Community Foundation’s services and various grant programs, please visit http://www.GiveDoorCounty.org.

The Door County Community Foundation, Inc. is a collection of separate charitable funds set up by individuals, families, non-profit organizations, private foundations and businesses that are managed, invested and disbursed for the current and future good of Door County. The Foundation was launched in 1999 and currently administers more than $18 million in charitable assets.

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Community Foundation Awards Sustainability Grant to Door County Library Foundation

The Door County Community Foundation has awarded the Door County Library a Sustainability Grant from the Children and Youth Fund. This grant will be used to purchase supplies for the Learning Resource Center, commonly called the Toy Barn.

The Toy Barn at the Door County Library’s Sturgeon Bay branch is a community resource filled with educational toys available for check out to families in the community.

“Research shows that play is a crucial focus for early literacy development,” said Richard Hauser, Board Member of the Door County Community Foundation. “The Toy Barn at the Door County Library is an important resource for our community members.”

2017-01-23-library-foundationFrom left to right: Beth Lokken, Youth Services Librarian of the Door County Library and Richard Hauser, Board Member of the Door County Community Foundation.

The Door County Library is uniquely qualified to collect, organize and circulate toys and games to the families in Door County. The staff is familiar with curating collections of materials. The process is much the same for toys as it is for books, magazines, electronic resources, or any other materials collected and circulated by the Library. The Library searches for materials that will entertain, educate or inspire the families in Door County. Most of the toys and games in the Toy Bar can be transported to the other branches of the Door County Library and are browse-able using the library catalog.

For more information about the Door County Library or the Learning Resource Center, please visit http://www.doorcountylibrary.com or call 920.743.6578.

The Door County Community Foundation’s Sustainability Grants program distributes grant dollars from funds such as the Arts Fund, Children & Youth Fund, Education Fund, Green Fund, Health & Human Needs Fund, Healthy Water Fund, Historic Preservation Fund, and the Women’s Fund.

For more information about the Community Foundation’s services and various grant programs, please visit http://www.GiveDoorCounty.org.

The Door County Community Foundation, Inc. is a collection of separate charitable funds set up by individuals, families, non-profit organizations, private foundations and businesses that are managed, invested and disbursed for the current and future good of Door County. The Foundation was launched in 1999 and currently administers more than $18 million in charitable assets.

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Cause Marketing – Good for Business, Not Always for Charity

When a business affiliates its brand with a beloved charity, it’s good for the company’s bottom line. Countless studies have conclusively shown that consumers are far more willing to spend money at a business if they know a percentage of their purchase is going to a nonprofit organization they respect.

Unfortunately, evidence is mounting that what’s good for business is not always good for charity.

These kinds of business-charity relationships are called “Cause Marketing” (or “Cause-Related Marketing”). It’s when a restaurant donates 10 percent of sales to charity this weekend. Or a bar donates $2 whenever a particular cocktail is sold on Friday night. These are easy ways for a business to affiliate its brand with a respected nonprofit while also generating a few dollars for the nonprofit organization in the process.

While every charity should recognize and honor the spirit behind these generous offers, handled improperly, Cause Marketing has the potential to offend some of an organization’s existing donors and can actually diminish overall giving.

Problem 1: It’s Potentially Disrespectful to Existing Donors

Consider, for instance, the owner of ABC Café. She loves and appreciates what her favorite charity does for Door County and thus makes a very generous contribution of $10,000. There are no conditions on this gift and she has no expectation of any special treatment.

Then the owner of XYZ Bistro offers to donate 15 percent of all dinner sales on Friday night to that same charity. He says that the total contribution might be as large as $1,000. However, in exchange for this gift, he expects that the charity publicly encourages its donors to eat at XYZ Bistro.

The concern is that when a charity encourages its donors to spend money at XYZ Bistro, at the very least, this is disrespectful and unfair to the owner of ABC Café who made a far larger gift without any expectation of free publicity. At worst, this kind of Cause Marketing relationship might even offend the owner of ABC Café and result in the loss of a generous friend.

Problem 2: It Can Reduce Overall Donations

Imagine that a company, Acme Lawn Maintenance, announces a Cause Marketing event in which 10 percent of every new annual lawn treatment contract will be donated to a Door County nonprofit. The nonprofit thus decides to promote this offer to its database of donors. As a result, one of its existing donors who typically makes a charitable donation of $250 every year decides to sign up with Acme Lawn Maintenance. The donor thus spends $1,000 on a new annual lawn treatment contract.

Later, when the nonprofit sends its annual fundraising letter, that same donor concludes he’s already given enough this year because he spent $1,000 on lawn maintenance to benefit the charity. In fact, the donor feels as if he’s made a larger contribution than in years past because he’s out $1,000 when in reality his purchase only generated $100 (10 percent of $1,000) for charity. That results in a net loss of $150 to the organization.

Rather than making both a purchase and a subsequent direct donation, people are increasingly considering their purchase as their donation. The researchers refer to this as the Cause Marketing Paradox. Consumers think of their purchase as a charitable act and decrease subsequent charitable acts. This can result in a net reduction in total donations from an individual donor.

Suggested Cause Marketing Guidelines

Every charity should honor the generous spirit that drives business owners who want to donate a percentage of sales, but nonprofits must also be mindful of the pitfalls of entering into a Cause Marketing relationship. Here are some simple guidelines that organizations can use when partnering with a business.

  • The charity should be appreciative of businesses that wish to host a Cause Marketing activity but generally refrain from promoting the activity itself. If a restaurant wants to donate 10 percent of sales on a particular night and promote the event to its own customers, the charity should be deeply thankful for this generous act. However, the key here is that it is the business promoting the event to its own customers. The charity plays no formal or public role telling its own existing donors to eat at a particular restaurant.
  • The charity should generally refrain from publicly encouraging its donors to purchase goods or services at one for-profit business rather than another. A respected charity will receive contributions from individuals and businesses all across a community. Inevitably, its donors will include businesses that are in direct competition with one another. The charity can and should publicly thank its business donors, but it is normally inappropriate for a charity to encourage its donors to shop, eat or otherwise buy services at one business over another.
  • The charity’s public recognition of a Cause Marketing relationship should be generally consistent with how it publicly celebrates any donor that makes a similar size contribution. For instance, if the restaurant’s commitment to donating 10 percent of sales generates a $1,000 donation, then the charity should recognize the restaurant as it would any donor of $1,000. If the charity publicly celebrates its $1,000 donors in its newsletter and social media accounts, then it makes sense to do so for the restaurant as well. However, it is normally unfair to publicly celebrate the restaurant any more – or any less – than the charity would do for another donor who made a gift of the same size.

Adopting simple guidelines like these will allow a charity to celebrate and thank the generous business owners of Door County in a manner which is both fair and respectful to all concerned.

This article, by President of CEO of the Door County Community Foundation Bret Bicoy, originally appeared in the Peninsula Pulse.

Create a Piece of Artwork and Earn Money for Your Favorite Door County Charity

The Community Foundation invites artists to submit their original artwork for inclusion in the Final Report of the Discuss Door County: Growing Older Initiative. The Community Foundation will donate $250 to each Door County charity or school selected by the artists whose work is included in the published Final Report. We expect to select 10 original paintings, sketches, sculptures and/or poems.

Discuss Door CountyDiscuss Door County is the banner under which the Door County Community Foundation listens to the community. Throughout 2016, community gathered together to share their aspirations and visions for us as we grow older together as part of Discuss Door County: Growing Older in Door County. The Final Report is an outgrowth of that work. Rather than releasing a dry report, the Community Foundation wants to add the flavor that is so indicative of Door County and enhance the report with artwork and creativity.

A public reception to release the Final Report and unveil the artwork will be held on May 9th, 2016 at Hope United Church of Christ in Sturgeon Bay from 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm.

The Community Foundation will accept original works of art that highlight any 1 of the 3 important themes of this work. Namely, an intergenerational community, the beauty of Door County, and/or connecting people.

Paintings and sketches should be on canvas, framed, or otherwise ready for public display. Sculptures should be display-ready as well. Pieces should be delivered to the Community Foundation at 342 Louisiana St., Sturgeon Bay by Wednesday, March 15th. Original poetry should be in an electronic form to kacie@givedoorcounty.org.

While the artist will retain ownership of the artwork, the Community Foundation will be assuming the unlimited right to reproduce the artwork in furtherance of its charitable mission.

Community Invited to Opening Reception for Artists Karen Lee Denoto and Renee Schwaller

The community is invited to attend a reception on Saturday, January 21st from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., at the Door County Community Foundation. The reception celebrates the Lobby Gallery Winter Exhibition featuring works by Karen Lee DeNoto and Renee Schwaller. The Community Foundation is located at 342 Louisiana Street in Sturgeon Bay, across the street from the Post Office.

karen-denotoKaren Lee Denoto is a native New Englander who has made Door County her home. Karen Lee spent over 20 years in the graphic arts business working with museums, publishers and artists. “A passion is a gift that demands you to embrace it if you are to find your authenticity and inner joy and peace,” says DeNoto. “Door County fuels that passion with its natural beauty. The creativity and synergistic energy on the peninsula is seductive and inspiring.”

renee-schwallerRenee Schwaller, owner of Off the Wheel Pottery, has her B. A. in communications from The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and studied pottery at the University of Minnesota-Minneapolis and the University of Hawaii. “The entire collection of work is created from start to finish in the studio at my home and business,” says Schwaller. “This allows me to draw inspiration from my natural surroundings and the simple things in that bring me joy.”

The Community Foundation’s reception is being coordinated with the “Prints Matter, Master Mimics” exhibition at the Miller Art Museum earlier that same evening. The exhibition will bring together twenty-two master Midwestern printmakers who are inspired by the masters of printmaking through time. Guests are encouraged to visit Sturgeon Bay and drop by both the Miller Art Museum and the Community Foundation Lobby Gallery opening receptions.

Refreshments will be served at the Door County Community Foundation by Morag Hornsby and her team at Serves You Right Catering.

Each quarter, different Door County artists will be invited to exhibit their work. The Gallery is normally open to the public during the Community Foundation’s regular hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

For more information about the Community Foundation’s various grant programs, visit www.GiveDoorCounty.org.

The Door County Community Foundation, Inc. is a collection of separate charitable
funds set up by individuals, families, non-profit organizations, private foundations and businesses that are managed, invested and disbursed for the current and future good of Door County. The Foundation was launched in 1999 and currently administers more than $17 million in charitable assets.

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Community Foundation Awards Sustainability Grant to Boys and Girls Club of Door County

The Door County Community Foundation has awarded Boys and Girls Club of Door County a Sustainability Grant from the Children and Youth Fund, the John and Nell Herlache Community Impact Fund, the Ruth & Hartley Barker Memorial Fund, and the Callsen Family Fund. This grant will be used to purchase supplies to assist the Boys and Girls Club in running their academic programming.

Every year the Boys & Girls Club of Door County has nearly 500 youth pass through its doors and between 180-200 every day. The Club works to provide programming to each of these children in order to help them achieve academic success, live healthier lives, and build good character and citizenship. With all of this activity going on, the Club uses a large amount of consumable supplies.

“The Boys and Girls Club of Door County is a safe positive place for the children in our community,” said Bill Boettcher, Board Member of the Door County Community Foundation. “They are consistently implementing programs that truly make a difference in the lives of the children they are serving.”

2016-10-26-b-g-clubFrom left to right: Julie Davis, Chief Executive Officer of the Boys and Girls Club of Door County and Bill Boettcher, Board Member of the Door County Community Foundation.

The mission of the Boys and Girls Club of Door County in to inspire all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens. The Club provides a safe environment both physically and emotionally with structure and clearly defined acceptable behaviors.

For more information about the Boy and Girls Club of Door County, please visit www.bgcdoorcounty.org or call 920.818.1046.

The Door County Community Foundation’s Sustainability Grants program distributes grant dollars from funds such as the Arts Fund, Children & Youth Fund, Education Fund, Green Fund, Health & Human Needs Fund, Healthy Water Fund, Historic Preservation Fund, and the Women’s Fund.

For more information about the Community Foundation’s services and various grant programs, please visit www.GiveDoorCounty.org.

The Door County Community Foundation, Inc. is a collection of separate charitable funds set up by individuals, families, non-profit organizations, private foundations and businesses that are managed, invested and disbursed for the current and future good of Door County. The Foundation was launched in 1999 and currently administers more than $17 million in charitable assets.

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Politics and the Shortest Poem in the English Language

The second shortest poem in the English language according to Bartlett’s Quotations is called, “On the Antiquity of Microbes.” The poem reads, “Adam, had ’em.”

I discovered this ridiculously obscure fact when I came across a commencement address given by the legendary boxer and political activist, Muhammad Ali. It was a thoughtful speech about how graduating students should use their education to make this a better world. Yet it is a speech best remembered for what he said after he finished his formal remarks.

A student yelled out to Ali, asking him to recite them a poem. Ali responded with what many now consider the shortest poem in the English Language.

Ali said, “Me. We.”

The outcome of the recent presidential election is being held up by the talking heads in the media as proof of an incredible divide that exists in our nation. My time in politics made me all too familiar with using demographic trends to divide the electorate and ride that wave to victory at the polls. Yet my subsequent experience in philanthropy has taught me that our shared values as Americans still bind us far more than our politics imply.

I had occasion to review Ali’s comments when I was preparing for a keynote speech I gave at the Volunteer Center’s Golden Heart Awards in 2015. As I so often do when writing a few comments, I prepared by reading the inspiring words of others who are much smarter and more eloquent than me.

While perusing the writings of commencement addresses and similar keynote speeches in years past, a common theme became readily apparent. Be true to yourself. Your time is limited, don’t waste it. Listen to your heart. Follow your passion. Dare to live your dream.

The clichés notwithstanding, there is some truth to all of this. Our time on this planet is limited, so we don’t want to waste it. Yet what struck me about all these speeches is that they overwhelmingly focused on the “Me.” What’s my heart say? What’s my passion? What’s my dream?

Now I don’t want to say that you shouldn’t listen to your heart, shouldn’t follow your passion, or shouldn’t live your dream. Of course you should. Yet I couldn’t help but think how diminished Door County would be if the people of our community only focused on the Me.

The author and New York Times columnist David Brooks writes about the difference between what he calls “résumé virtues” and “eulogy virtues.” The résumé virtues are the ones you list on your résumé. Your professional skills. Your job history. The work you’ve done that has contributed to your professional and economic success.

Eulogy virtues, on the other hand, are much deeper and more meaningful. These are the virtues that are talked about, well, at your funeral. These are the things that are core to your being. Perhaps it’s generosity. Or kindness. Or compassion.

Whatever they are, we intuitively know that eulogy virtues are far more important than résumé virtues. Yet as a society, and in our politics, we focus on our résumés. We direct most of our energy on the Me.

It’s disheartening that we spend so little time talking about eulogy virtues because they are how the world will ultimately view and remember us. Our eulogy virtues define our character.

Thankfully, by working in philanthropy, I am privileged to meet countless people in our community who define good character. Inevitably they are giving of themselves to bring people together in service of our larger community. Yet what makes them memorable is not what they do, or what they accomplished, though it might be grand. We remember them for the kind of people they are.

But here’s a little secret. None of these good people was born with good character. You have to build it. Brooks reminds us that it requires effort and artistry. Character is not comparative. It is not something you earn by being better than others. Character is developed by being better than you used to be. It comes from being sturdy when tested. Remaining faithful when tempted. Getting up after we have fallen down. Character comes from inner triumphs, not external accomplishments.

When people of character listen to their heart, it tells them to be generous with others. When they follow their passion, it is in support of a larger truth. When they live their dream, it becomes part of a greater good.

These giving people have made that transition from the Me to the We. In this view of the world, we don’t create our lives, we are summoned by life. We don’t find answers by looking within, we seek to be of value by looking without.

The question to ask is not what do I want out of life? Instead, ask yourself, what does life want from me? The Me is never more consequential than when it is in service of the larger We.

Brooks writes that all of us are given gifts, aptitudes, capacities – talents that strictly speaking, we did not earn. All of us are also put into circumstances that call out for action. These circumstances are our opportunity to use our gifts.

We all can walk this path together. None of us as individuals is as strong as when all of us come together in service of one another.

Ultimately, we must face up to the reality that the world existed long before we arrived and will be here long after we are gone. In this brief moment in eternity that is our life, this short time that defines the entirety of our existence, we have been brought together in this place and at this time by fate, by history, by chance, by evolution, by God. Regardless of what it is you believe that brought us together, together we are.

Me. We.

This article, written by Door County Community Foundation President and CEO Bret Bicoy, originally appeared in the Peninsula Pulse